A LIGHT IN DARK PLACES: FAITH AND MENTAL ILLNESS

May it be a light to you in dark places, when all other lights go out.
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

When I saw The FellowShip of the Ring movie for the first time, those words struck me like a hammer on an anvil. They were spoken to Froddo, the hobbit whose task it was to take the dreaded One Ring to Mount Doom, as encouragement by the Lady Galadriel when she gave him a small crystal phial, filled with the light of Eärendil’s star. She knew that dark days lay ahead for Froddo and his companions and in an act of mercy, compassion and support she gave him light for those times when it felt like the darkness is overwhelming, that there was no other source of light.

So, why were those words so powerful for me?

For years now I have been asked by friends, family, counselors, leaders, teammates, advocates and spokespersons to write about faith and mental illness. While the two have been covered in enough written words to fill the Library of Congress, I feel that we have not seen the two discussed together enough and when it is there is far too much clinical writing and not enough first-hand accounts. So, like two awkward teenagers slow dancing for the first time under the lights, faith and mental illness are often seen touching hands, when in reality they should embrace in an intimate setting that can bring hope, light, love, peace and strength that only a strong relationship can.

Let me state right now that I am not a trained therapist nor mental health professional. What I’m going to write is merely my opinion intermixed with my faith and what I have learned through my own journey with mental illness.

Read the rest of the article on JeremyHolm.com 



jeremyAbout the Author– American bobsled pilot and coach Jeremy Holm is a respected author, motivational speaker, journalist and graphic designer. Jeremy was born in Pennsylvania and grew up in Oklahoma and Utah where he currently resides. A graduate of Skyline High School, he attended Salt Lake Community College and Brigham Young University after serving a Christian mission to Honduras and Belize.

Jeremy became one of the world’s first adaptive bobsled coaches when he began instructing the U.S. Adaptive Bobsled Team in 2009. In 2008 Jeremy founded The Athlete Outreach Project, a philanthropic organization that uses sport and the Olympic movement to serve the community. Jeremy is also the author of two books: The Champion’s Way and Fire on Ice.

 

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